Magnificient Massage of the Senses

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PAUL JONES AND DHARSHAN MUNIDASA (STANDING CHEF YUJI IMAIZUMI). THE SUSHI WITH THE SEAWEED ROLL IS THE “MAKI ROLL” AND THE OTHER ONE IS “NIGIRI”

I’m in gastronomic heaven! And I didn’t even have to die to get here. I write from the capital of the worlds finest gastronomic country. I revel in this unmatched reverence of the freshest of ingredients, be it rice, tea to seafood and more. And here’s the surprise, I do so in its  exclusive sushi restaurant as well in it’s oasis-like, fabulously well-appointed award-winning spa. I am regaled with a massage of all my senses. And all this in the iconic Mandarin Oriental which  brings contemporary elegance to Nihonbashi, the historical and cultural centre of Tokyo commerce. True to its surroundings, it blends the best of past and future architectural splendor. The dynamic Paul Jones who helms this landmark has a strong India connection (having lived and spearheaded hotels there) and now in Tokyo is not only extremely well-versed in the Japanese culture but is as much a sushi fan as he is of Indian food.

SUSHI IN THE SKY

We float above Tokyo, on the 38th floor of the iconic Mandarin Oriental and the floor-to-ceiling glass windows  serve up breathtaking views of the revered Mt Fuji and the dynamic city panorama. No wonder this magnificent Sushi restaurant is called Sushi Soro (soro means sky). In front of us in this 8 seater Sushi Soro restaurant is maestro Yuji Imaizumi who has over 20 years of refined experience.

We all know that Japanese cuisine is acknowledged to be the worlds most sophisticated cuisine, it combines the artistic with precision, freshest and finest of produce, seasonality and a reverence that is unmatched in the world.  Explaining the cuisine’s intricacies. is Chef Dharshan Munidasa, who is half Japanese and half Srilankan and coinicidentally, his award winning Japanese restaurant in Colombo is called Nihonbashi. He guides me through the worlds largest fish market, Tsukiji, (where he flies in to regularly buy seafood and more) too.  Over a relaxed Omakase experience, we watch this true master of Tokyo’s authentic “Edo-mae” style of traditional sushi cuisine as he works deftly  on the sushi counter sculpted from a 350 year old Japanese cypress tree.

SUSHI: DID YOU KNOW?

We all know that “su shi”(sour rice) and it represents the category of Japanese foods which consist of cooked, seasoned rice served with fish, meat, vegetables, or other ingredients. The common varieties are maki rolls ( wrapped with seaweed or Nori), nigiri (individual mounds of rice topped with other ingredients).

But did you know ?

*That the most important component of sushi is rice? Think about rice to sushi as dough is to pizza: if your dough is no good, the pizza is no good, regardless how excellent its toppings.

*Sushi etiquette: Eat the sushi with your fingers (not chopsticks). Use the oshibori – a hot, moist towel neatly rolled up, to clean your hands during the meal, but when done, make sure to place it neatly to the side, not crumpled in a ball.

*You will be served pickled sweetened ginger (gari) , a swipe of wasabi ( a kind of horseradish).  We make the common mistake of eating the gari with the sushi, actually it is meant to be eaten in between the sushi bites. We make the common mistake of adding wasabi into soy sauce and using it as a dipping sauce. Wasabi can be added to pieces of sashimi, or placed atop nigiri – but not mixed into soy sauce. Many omakase bars will pre-lacquer your nigiri with soy, so you won’t even have to worry about soy sauce and dipping.

But let’s say that a few nigiri pieces are not pre-sauced. Always, always dip your nigiri fish side into the soy sauce, as opposed to dunking the bottom rice part head first. If you dip rice first, too much soy will be absorbed, and overpower the fish’s delicate flavor.

Totally Tokyo

Excuse me while I get rejuvenated  through Five different Routes with a spa journey featuring five essentially Japanese ingredients. This in the heavenly space in the sky spa. In Mandarin Oriental’s treatment named “Totally Tokyo” you can be sure rice plays a stellar role, plum, green tea, pine and bamboo too.. Enveloped in sounds filtered through bamboo speakers and the fragrance of green tea, a pine-oil footbath, a plum-salt scrub, and a warming rice hull pack expertly applied by the therapist while the everhelpful and super efficient  Michiko Fujikawa fluently explains it all in English. This ofcourse after the deeply relaxing shiatsu-style massage. Did I forget to tell you that through the big glass windows, the sacred snow-capped Mt Fuji in the blue winter skies is also blessing my magnifcient massage of the  senses?

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